Tag Archives: christianity

I’m Ba-ack…

So, it’s almost September.  So, I have hardly posted this month.  So, life has been a little busy.

Tonight, just a small taste of what’s to come in the next few weeks, a quote:

Nothing exists outside of narrative — Chris Abani

I’ve been mulling over this quote for the past week or so, slowly testing it out.  It’s one of those quotes that I read and immediately some emotional response in me shouts, “oh, cool!” but I’m not sure that it’s true.  The more I think about it, however, the more I agree.  Now, I’m not saying I completely agree yet, but I’m agreeing more and more.

That is, we all ‘buy in’ to certain narratives that give meaning to our lives.  As for myself, I buy into the Christian narrative: God created, man turned away, God redeemed man, we participate with God in the redemption of humanity and the earth.  Some believe in self-narrative: the world is neither good nor bad, only judged by that which makes me happy and comfortable (I often tend to this view, as well).  Some believe in other religious narratives: the stories of Buddha or Muhammad.

Yet, beyond this basic meaning, these narratives frame our decisions, our hopes, even our emotions.  The stories that we believe about ourselves and our communities defines us.  It causes us to act and feel certain ways.

I’ll stop here.  I could go further into this — and probably will in upcoming days — but it’s late and Brooke is getting ready for bed.  But I’m back, and still thinking…

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Golf and a Link

So, it’s been a pretty normal Thursday: a morning of writing and an afternoon of work for The Gathering.  Right now, Brooke is out on some errands and I’m winding down for the day.  It looks like it could be a movie night, with the possibility of a round of golf tomorrow morning (par 3, of course).  We’ll see what happens.  All I know is that with Tiger out for the summer, I definitely see an opening.

In other news, I know I’ve talked about language and the Bible, and I thought this article was appropriate.  Sometimes, working at The Gathering and trying to redefine Christianity, I really feel like the pastor … er … dude this article is about.  And, it offers some levity when I get overly worked up about semantics.

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Two Brothers…

The Kin is made up of Thorry and Isaac Koren who grew up singing harmonies in the backseat of the car on family trips.  In 2003, they wrote a song together as a wedding present for their father.  It was at that moment that the brothers realized they should write music together all the time.

Each coming to America, Thorry and Isaac got an old VW bus and drove across the country.  Along the way they wanted to live the human experience: they made friends and wrote songs and fell in love with America.  According to their bio, “they were struck by the beauty and the struggle that permeates human life.”  

Without going into the full album, I want to highlight the song “Abraham.”  Captivating for both melody and lyrics, the song wrestles with the world’s major monotheistic religions as it pulls out the differences and similarities.  It strikes to the core of human life: the basic beliefs that over half the world holds, sprung from two brothers who were fathered by Abraham.  It lets you experience the struggle and beauty in life.  It breaks down walls.

Here’s the song.  It’s an opening between faiths, it’s a story of two brothers.  Enjoy…

And the lyrics:

Abraham 

There’s a tale
Told by soldiers
Of two sons and their father
As they sailed to old Palestine

True were these brothers
They sailed to bury their father
They would fight for Jerusalem

You will be meek when I am able
You’ll be the salt upon the table
When all is said and done could you
Somehow be sons of Abraham

I was told by a stranger
Of a young blood thrown to the desert
He united a people with his hands

In the wane to the crescent
He fed the lion to the pheasant
He would stride to the spring of Zam Zam

There’s a tale told by soldiers
A young boy taken to slaughter
He was saved by his father’s hand

He was prized and protected
And prince he was elected
He was to save the wolves with a lamb

There’s a tomb out by Jordan
Where two sides stop to adore him
As they fight for Jerusalem 

For more on Christian-Muslim dialogue, click here.

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